Category Archives: Music Gear

Yamaha MR10 Drum samples

Here they are: http://www.cornwarning.com/xfer/MR10.zip

Single Hits of each sound. Sampled the toms at a few different tunings.
One longer wav with all the 4 bar loop patterns.

Mono 24-bit 44.1khz files.

There’s another, more exhaustive set here, but they’re asking money for them: http://www.dubsounds.com/mr-10.htm
And another from the venerable Music Machines collection: http://machines.hyperreal.org/manufacturers/Yamaha/MR-10/samples/index.html

IMG_0829

Groove, Metastability and Randomness

[audio:http://www.cornwarning.com/chaircrusher/Chaircrusher-TestPercussionGroove.mp3|titles=test percussion groove|artists=chaircrusher] http://www.cornwarning.com/chaircrusher/Chaircrusher-TestPercussionGroove.mp3

bazille
This is a recording of two loops playing in Ableton Live. One is a percussion drum rack, the second is the U-He Bazille instrument run through several effects.
This loop plays the same notes, but will never actually play the same one bar sounds twice, for two interlocking reasons.

First, both instruments go through a gate effect, which is adjusted so that the threshold is at the point of metastability, meaning that it spends most of it’s time on the cusp of closing and cutting off the sound.

Second, the Bazille patch uses random LFOs to modulate the levels of two oscillators as they modulate each other. On top of that, each of the two random LFOs is modulating the rate of the other, and the cutoff of a low pass filter through which the resulting signal passes. This accounts for the filtered noise sounds continually changing sound.

In addition, the two MIDI clips driving the sounds are modified by two different groove timings.

So the loop never repeats, and yet it also stays the same. The variety of the loop has musical value — in the same way (but not equal to) a human drummer adds vitality and interest to a repeated drum pattern with micro-variations of timing and dynamics. And the repetition of the loop has musical value, in the way a groove can entrain the listener’s mind.

It’s the wisdom of Heraclitus embodied: “No man ever steps in the same river twice.” It’s the same and not the same. Though I’m neither as wise as Heraclitus nor as musically talented as a significant percentage of humanity.

VOLCA JAMMIN

Sometimes you try something and it’s accidentally kinda compelling. The setup was

  • Volca Beats
  • Volca Keys
  • Jupiter 6
  • Meeblip Anode
  • Eventide UltraVerb on one send
  • Audiodamage Dubstation16 on the second send.

This is straight up tracky. It’s live mixing/tweaking. I actually added effects and the anode while recording. There’s minimal EQ-ing on the Volca Keys and Volca Beats.  I did some limiting and EQ on the mix-down and edited out the 16 or so measures where the anode was doing this unpitched farting noise.

Syncing the Volcas to Ableton Live is kind of wonky. It seems to work marginally better if you set the sync mode to pattern. The only way I found to get it tight was to hit the ‘play’ button a few times quickly. If you just hit play once, it always starts out of sync. Somehow resetting the counter to 1:1:0 a few times while Live is playing gets things lined up properly.

http://www.cornwarning.com/chaircrusher/Chaircrusher-2014-10-07.mp3

[audio:http://www.cornwarning.com/chaircrusher/Chaircrusher-2014-10-07.mp3|titles=2014-10-07|artists=Chaircrusher]

Getting a good Korg Volca{Beats,Keys,Bass} AC Power Adapter

I’m sure I’m not the only person who got their new Korg Volca thing home only to discover that the power jack doesn’t fit any of the AC adapters you have laying around. This is annoying. I for one have a box with about 30 different power adapters to check through. But I have found a good, cheap solution.

First off, what you need is this:

  • DC 9V
  • Center Positive
  • 1.7mm connector

According to this guy, Matthew Zipkin A Volca device never consums more than 80mA, so pretty much any 9V AC adapter has enough juice to power multiple Volcas.

The problem is the plug is an uncommon size, 1.7mm. If you want to try splicing something together look for the yellow-tipped plugs. If I recall correctly, old Sony CD Walkmans used the 1.7mm plug. But another solution is this: Adafruit sells 2.1mm to 1.7mm DC jack adapters for $2.50. They also sell a 9VDC Center-positive 1000MA supply for 6.95.

The Adafruit solution is actually cheaper than the AC adapters I just bought on Amazon.com, with higher power output.

You can also power multiple Volcas from a single supply with guitar effect daisy chain cable, if you buy enough 2.1mm to 1.7mm adapters.

adapter